An Aromatherapy Book Review

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Lavender about to bloom, France

I recently wrote a book review for my aromatherapy association and thought I’d share it on my blog. As with any book, recipe, blog, article or whatever I ever refer to, I don’t receive payment, have an affiliate agreement etc. etc. I just enjoy sharing information that I find interesting or useful and if someone else does too, then that’s great. There’s a lot of really excellent aromatherapy books out there and I’m happy to add this latest resource to my collection. Plus, posting this is an excuse to find a photo of some lavender about to burst into bloom, an antidote to the annoyance I’m feeling as I look at the window and see snow falling, again. Spring isn’t that far away!! We should be noticing daffodils and crocuses and extra frenzied birdsong by now!

The Complete Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Handbook for Everyday Wellness by Nerys Purchon and Lora Cantele (2014)

I would hesitate to say that any book on aromatherapy and essential oils is ‘complete’. It’s a bold statement that implies there is no more work to be done. As our understanding of these wonderful essences evolve, so too will printed resources. What The Complete Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Handbook for Everyday Wellness manages to do is straddle an interesting midline between introducing aromatherapy to readers who are learning about essential oils for the first time and providing valuable information that professional aromatherapists must surely appreciate, without however diving fully into clinical aromatherapy. I myself hover in that middle ground –  not learning about essential oils for the first time, but certainly not as experienced as the authors of this useful and informative book.

This is clearly a well written and generous (at 480 pages, very generous) handbook on the properties and uses of essential oils, succeeding in its stated aim to provide ‘sound information, based on both tradition and contemporary research’. The authorial pedigree is impressive: trained nurse Nerys Purchon (who passed away in 2011), established Rivendell Farm in Western Australia, studying natural medicine, growing herbs and becoming the country’s first producer of a cruelty-free line of cosmetics.The conducive climate of Australia seemed to inspire her practice with its abundance of therapeutic and perfumed plants. Lora Cantele, registered clinical aromatherapist, aromatherapy educator, lecturer and writer discovered aromatherapy by chance after suffering continual pain following two car accidents. Serendipitous gifts of healing essential oil blends from caring friends appeared to have triggered her commitment to aromatherapy and to spreading the word of this powerful practice.

The book begins with a general introduction to essential oils, explaining what they are, how they are used and safety guidelines to follow, then splits into four parts. Useful ‘tips’ are abundantly scattered throughout while cautions are highlighted in a box with a grey background in the sidebars, cleverly catching the eye to impart crucial safety information and precautions. My only caveat here would be the ‘tip’ p.36 on dosages for ‘children, the elderly and the frail’ which I think would do better highlighted as a ‘caution’.

Part 1: The Oils includes over a hundred detailed descriptions of different oils, including latin names, chemotype if appropriate, uses and precautions. Some interesting new oils, new to me at any rate, are described; Fragonia, Plai and Saro jumped out. Nor does the book shy away from mentioning oils that are not yet clinically evaluated and carry cautions, but which could prove useful such as Kanuka and the aforementioned Fragonia. There are descriptions of hydrolats in this section as well as carrier and infused oils. The latter made for particularly enjoyable reading – infused oils are a cost effective and usually safe way to experience the benefits of helpful plants and the authors provide clear and easy instructions to follow should you feel inspired to make delicious sounding concoctions such as elderflower or passionflower oil.

Part 2: Remedies offers copious recipes for various ailments, in an alphabetic range from abrasions to workplace stress. Specific men’s and women’s issues are covered here as are – and this is where the book also hovers in that middle ground – baby massages, pregnancy, douches, even cancer. In such cases however the authors stress  following professional advice from doctors and aromatherapists who specialize in, for instance, cancer care; following the recipes to the letter, and repeatedly caution the home practitioner to be thoroughly acquainted with any criteria that might prevent treatment.

Part 3: Aromatherapy for Daily Living we move onto frankly delicious sounding recipes for face – Satin Skin Gel springs to mind – hair, and body. (I question the inclusion of Rosewood essential oil in several recipes. In the profile of the oil, having mentioned the threat to the continued existence of the Rosewood tree – from environmental issues and over-harvesting – and the difficulty of sourcing the oil ethically, why indicate its use?). Further recipes include natural cleaning products for the home and the best oils to use for massages.

Part 4: Practicalities.The book rounds up a detailed, enjoyable and instructing trip through the essential oil landscape, offering equipment suggestions, how to measure and store oils and resources from around the world including oil suppliers and aromatherapy organizations.

A valuable and educational addition to any aspiring or current aromatherapists library, The Complete Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Handbook for Everyday Wellness is a book that easily communicates the dedication of its authors to the wonderful world of aromatherapy, their generosity of spirit in sharing their expertise and the creative means to pursue a healthier way of life.

 

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